Ariadna Cymet Lanski, Psy.D.

Therapy Effectiveness

FAQ

Therapy Effectiveness

 

Studies have shown that the longer the patient stays in therapy the greater the benefits.  According to Seligman, Howard & Lambert (1996) and a consumer report survey (Consumer Report, 1995) included 4,100 respondents to a survey mailed to a random sample of 184,000 subscribers to the magazine. Key findings of the survey included (1) Clients benefit substantially from psychotherapy.  About 90% of respondents who felt “very poorly” at the beginning of therapy, said therapy “helped somewhat” or “helped a lot”; (2) Psychotherapy alone worked as well as psychotherapy combined with medication; (3) the longer people stayed in therapy the more they improved.  This suggests that limited mental health services –like limited health insurance coverage and the new trends in health plans emphasizing short-term therapies- may be misguided.

 

People that stay in therapy for a longer period of time (6 months to a year) improves in three distinct ways.  First, therapy eases the initial complaint that brings people into treatment.  Second, it helps them to function better by improving their ability to relate to others, to be productive, and to cope with daily stressors.  Third, people in therapy develop more confidence and self-esteem, understand themselves better, and enjoy life more. 

    

Achieving a balanced life, accepting and loving yourself and reaching your goals are within your reach.  Through therapy you can overcome a variety of life issues and personal challenges.  I would like to enable you to achieve the life that you want!     

 

 

Link to Consumer Report article:

http://www.apa.org/releases/consumer.html or

http://horan.asu.edu/cpy702readings/seligman/seligman.html